Implementing cross-sectoral policies for suicide prevention – challenges and opportunities

Host/co-host

The Public Health Agency of Sweden together with The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

About the host/co-host

The Public Health Agency of Sweden: has a national responsibility for public health issues and works to ensure good public health. The Agency has been assigned by the national government to coordinate cross-sectoral suicide prevention on national level. This work takes its departure from Sweden’s National Action Plan on Suicide Prevention, a policy that was adopted by the Swedish parliament in 2008.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA): The agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that leads public health efforts to advance the behavioral health of the nation. Among its many tasks, SAMHSA provides suicide prevention information and other helpful resources to behavioral health professionals, the general public, and people at risk.

Location

Stockholm, Sweden

Theme of this match

Exploring the challenges and opportunities associated with the development and implementation of broad policies to prevent suicide, on different levels in society.

International, national, regional and local policies on suicide prevention often take a broad, cross-sectoral approach, incorporating both population or community based strategies and strategies aimed at specific target groups and individuals at high risk for suicide involving e.g. health care, justice systems, school systems, transport and urban safety planning. Such broad policies provide opportunities to build bridges across borders of different societal sectors, as well as across a variety of professions and roles that different leaders have within the field of suicide prevention. At the same time, implementation of cross-sectoral suicide prevention strategies can be associated with a number of challenges, for example, ensuring seamless integration of services that focus on the individual needs while implementing a population level intervention; sustainability in the face of depleting resources; and evaluating the collective impact of multiple strategies on different levels. These issues will be discussed in a match on suicide prevention which takes its departure from different country’s experiences with implementing broad suicide prevention policies on different levels in society.

Maximum capacity

35 persons

 

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